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Tag: Social Networks

Mapping the NBA

Deadspin: You all know the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon game. Some of you may even be familiar with the Erdős number, which uses authorship of math papers to measure the “collaborative distance” between a person and the mathematician Paul Erdős. I applied this same type of thinking to sports and went looking for the Center of the NBA Universe. You can also play around with the project

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Is the Personalization of the Web Making us Dumber?

Mashable: This “invisible algorithmic editing of the web,” as [Eli] Pariser describes it, “moves us to a world where the Internet shows us what it thinks we need to see, but not what we should see.” Beyond Facebook, Pariser notes the huge diversity of search results his friends find on Google about topics like Egypt, where one friend sees news about recent protests and Lara Logan, while another sees results about travel and vacations. In turn, Pariser believes we’re collectively creating what he calls a personal “filter bubble,” which is also the title of a book on the subject due… Read Is the Personalization of the Web Making us Dumber?

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Social Media & Publishing

The Chronicle: participants say social media are “being used as an alternative to the existing system by young researchers who feel frustrated” by the tight control that senior scholars and traditional publishers have over the selection and dissemination of research. Good papers increasingly turn up in the social-media networks, according to people in these focus groups. “They’re even beginning to question peer review,” Mr. Nicholas said. “They were honestly saying it’s more important to contact and connect with loads of people than simply pay homage to one or two authorities.” Some publishers who provided contact information for the survey have… Read Social Media & Publishing

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Twitter as a tool for thinking

Charles Fernyhough: But I suspect that I also use Twitter to think out loud. I’ve written previously on this blog about children’s private speech, and how it seems to be their medium of thinking before verbal thought becomes internalized. I wonder whether I use Twitter for some of the same purposes. Talking to yourself seems to have many different functions, for adults as well as children. For one thing, it can express feelings. Many of children’s private utterances seem to have a function in emotion expression and regulation. I don’t have any data on the topic, but I suspect that… Read Twitter as a tool for thinking

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The Big Tent or Digital Divide?

Alex Reid: The other significant part of the digital humanities that is not captured in this call is the humanistic investigation of digital technoculture: no mention of games studies, social media, or mobile technology. In other words, no mention of the significant digital technologies and practices that are transforming human experience on a global scale. No, instead, we’re going to talk about writing software to analyze hundreds of out of print literary texts that no one can even name. Admittedly that last sentence may seem derisive, and honestly I don’t have a problem with scholars who want to pursue such… Read The Big Tent or Digital Divide?

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Wikipedia’s Gender Gap

Noam Cohen of the New York Times Even the most famous fashion designers — Manolo Blahnik or Jimmy Choo — get but a handful of paragraphs. And consider the disparity between two popular series on HBO: The entry on “Sex and the City” includes only a brief summary of every episode, sometimes two or three sentences; the one on “The Sopranos” includes lengthy, detailed articles on each episode. Is a category with five Mexican feminist writers impressive, or embarrassing when compared with the 45 articles on characters in “The Simpsons”? I think the quote above shows why user driven content… Read Wikipedia’s Gender Gap

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The Social Network of 19th Century Brit Lit

I came across this interesting project via twitter. While the exact approach does not carry over to history (the project visualized a social network using the dialogue in 19th century British novels, but, unfortunately, most of the “dialogue” of history gets lost), it makes the project I am working on for my digital history seminar (visualizing social and political networks) seem more timely. I just wish they put the project online (or if they have done so, provided a link).

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